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A tragic breaking news led Huang Hsin-Chien to begin contemplating about digital civilization’s impacts on our world. He decided to become a new media artist and began using technology to tell stories about people and technology, and this book is his way of sharing his experiences and realizations from the past 25 years on his journey of migrating from engineering to art-making.
To know the future, the past has to be first understood. With his increasing awareness for the importance of the History of Technology in today’s technology-driven era, Huang Hsin-Chien has placed the focus of this book on how technology has altered humanity, lifestyles, and history. “Technology originates from humanity” but “human nature can be both good and evil.” If used fittingly, technologies intended for war and killing can also be used to save lives. However, a good invention can also cause serious problems if used poorly. In order to make the world a better place, we must decode the motives and intentions behind different technologies and to understand the impacts that those technologies have on our lives and our environment.
Huang Hsin-Chien hopes that this book can become a seed that will blossom in many people as they realize the importance of integrating humanity with technology and to understand that fostering transdisciplinary talents is not something that can be achieved in a hurry; it is a process that should be persisted for generations to come.

Huang Hsin-Chien (New Media Artist)
 
Huang Hsin-Chien, son of renowned oil painter Lee Lan, grew up surrounded by traditional art from his family. He received his first computer, Apple II, when he was in high school, and programming has since become his second language. After acquiring substantial mechanical engineering training from National Taiwan University, Huang then studied design in the United States, where he attended the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena and Illinois Institute of Technology’s Institute of Design. Upon graduation, he was awarded the first prize in the New Voices New Visions Interactive Media Competition in the United States, and later collaborated with new media artist Laurie Anderson in creating her first interactive CD-ROM, Puppet Motel. Huang then worked for Sega of America and Sony Computer Entertainment America as art director, and was a developer of interactive applications for Interval Research Cooperation, a company founded by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen.
Huang returned to Taiwan in 2001 and began a career in new media art. He has exhibited in international galleries, art museums, and festivals, including Taipei Fine Arts Museum, National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, Venice Biennale, Shanghai Biennale, Ars Electronica Linz, Beijing 798 Art District, Gana Art Gallery in Seoul, and 404 International Festival of Electronic Arts in Argentina. Also as a commissioned artist, Huang has produced creative works for the Future Museum of NPM (National Palace Museum), Chinese pop singer Jay Chou's Concert, Eslite Poetry Festival, Taipei Pavilion in the Shanghai World Expo, Pavilion of Dreams in the Taipei Floral Expo, public artwork entitled Listening at the Taipei MRT Huilong Station, Our Personal Public Art at the Taipei MRT Nankang Exhibition Hall Station, and The Moment We Meet at the Taipei MRT World Trade Center Station. Awarded by the president of Taiwan with the Pride of Taiwan distinction in 2011, Huang was also the recipient of the 8th Keep Walking Fund.
Currently an associate professor of National Chengchi University’s Digital Contents and Technologies Program, Huang is dedicated to new media art education and publication, and has written the following books: Pictographic Labyrinth and Technology Mirage

  • Foreword by Laurie Anderson
  • Preface/ Technology originates from humanity (Huang Hsin-chien)
  • Awakening
    • 01 The 1.7 Billion Dollar Firework
    • 02 Put Your Life on the Line
    • 03 Games that Kill
    • 04 Top Notch Design
    • 05 Human Nature as Modified by Material
  • Stop, Look Back
    • 06 Fucked up Beyond all Recognition
    • 07 Where are We Rushing to?
    • 08 Reptile in the Human Brain
    • 09 The Unit to Live by
    • 10 Neanderthals that don’t Gossip
    • 11 Digital Era Anomalies
    • 12 Heritage I
    • 13 Heritage II
    • 14 Heritage III
  • Imagine the Possibilities in the World
    • 15 Idea as the Most Beautiful Artwork
    • 16 The Rise and Fall of Material and Spiritual Civilizations
    • 17 Software for Dolphins
    • 18 Independent Film Makers Under the Sea
    • 19 Cause and Effect in the Disorderly World
    • 20 Deducting Technology
    • 21 Heart’s Sword
    • 22 The Return to the State of Mind
  • History of Technology
    • 23 Babel
    • 24 Things with Humanity
    • 25 Opera through the Phone
    • 26 The Newer the Better?
    • 27 The Trendy Life of Dinosaurs
    • 28 The Body’s On/Off Switch
    • 29 Remnants of Things
    • 30 Remnants of Names
    • 31 Thomas Edison’s Ambition
    • 32 A Bet on the Trotting Horse and the American Monopoly
    • 33 The Driving Force behind Progress
    • 34 Geography of the New Era
    • 35 Black and White Television, Black and White Dreams
    • 36 The Personal Chronicle
  • New Cause and Effect
    • 37 Karmic Retribution
    • 38 Artificial Nature
    • 39 Correspondents between the Sky and the Earth
    • 40 E-mails from the Other Side
    • 41 A Song after the Earthquake
    • 42 Fascinating Cause and Effect Sparked by Hope
    • 43 Born to Die
    • 44 Seeing the World through the Eye of a Deceased
  • Reshaping Space-time
    • 45 New Distance
    • 46 Actual and Virtual Addresses
    • 47 Immortality I
    • 48 Immortality II
    • 49 Immortality III
    • 50 Immortality IV
    • 51 Immortality V
  • The Power of being Small
    • 52 Everyone will be Famous for Fifteen Minutes
    • 53 Light Bulb above the Head
    • 54 Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence at Home
    • 55 reCAPTCHA
    • 56 Odds and Ends, A Force to be Reckoned With
    • 57 Democracy: Distribution of Responsibility in Small Doses
    • 58 Small Doses of Privacy
    • 59 For the Great Self to be Smarter, the Individual Self has to get Dumber
    • 60 Micro-knowledge and the Half-baked Era
  • Technology for Killing
    • 61 Fatal Cell Phone
    • 62 Xbox Controller on the Battlefield
    • 63 The Army’s YouTube
    • 64 Cannot Surrender to a Helicopter
    • 65 Killing while Hiding in a Safe Place
    • 66 The Army’s Power Ranger
    • 67 Top-Selling Killing Simulation Game
    • 68 The Embargo of Video Game Console
    • 69 Microwaved Seagull
    • 70 Law for Restricting the Height of Car Bumpers
    • 71 We don’t Deliver Babies
  • The Gaming Years
    • 72 Where is the Self ?
    • 73 Multiple Personalities
    • 74 Pat on the Head from Machines
    • 75 New Immigrants
    • 76 King of the World
    • 77 Are You Playing a Game or Sleeping?
    • 78 Boundless Imagination
    • 79 The Reason for 1/3 of the Time Wasted on the Computer
    • 80 Super Mario’s Psychedelic Trip
    • 81 A One Time Game
    • 82 Lineage's Economy of Scale
    • 83 Mind Body Disconnect
    • 84 Lured Behavior
  • Love as Technology Spreads
    • 85 Love at First Sight
    • 86 Progression of the Dear John Letter
    • 87 Thief of Hearts
    • 88 Digital Generation Gap
    • 89 Alternative Friendship
    • 90 Online Murder Committed in the Name of Love
    • 91 Beauty in the Clouds
    • 92 Special Matchmaker
    • 93 Death and Wedding
    • 94 Instant Messaging, Lame Jokes, and One-night Stand
  • Human Technology
    • 95 74 Minutes and 42 Seconds
    • 96 Buildings with Human Characters
    • 97 Midnight Riddle
    • 98 Reading Water
    • 99 Photograph and Evidence
    • 100 Strength in Numbers
    • 101 Real and Fake Interactions
    • 102 Digital Family
    • 103 Unrighteous Vending Machine
    • 104 Automobile Culture
    • 105 Mimicry on the Road
    • 106 Racist Bridge
  • Slave Engineering
    • 107 Digital Slavery
    • 108 Mad Hatter in Wonderland
    • 109 Heart Donation
    • 110 I am a Hotspot
    • 111 Traces of having been Plugged
    • 112 Digital Colonialism
  • The Engineering of “Seeing”
    • 113 Painted Skin
    • 114 The Most Expensive Commercial
    • 115 Blockbuster Films =Special Effects Films
    • 116 Fooling the Eyes
    • 117 Keeping an Eye out for the Next Stop Light
  • Digital Zen
    • 118 Digital Zen
    • 119 Zen Sounds I
    • 120 Zen Sounds II
    • 121 Stop Motion
    • 122 Heart of Koi
  • Reflections on Technological Art
    • 123 Artwork that Stares Back
    • 124 Is an Artwork without Audience still Art?
    • 125 Flush Toilet as State Secret
    • 126 Digital Antique: Skills of ‘New’ Media Artists
    • 127 The Way Techno Artists Dress
    • 128 Extremely Small within Extremely Big
    • 129 Audience or Performer?
    • 130 Memories of Sounds
    • 131 Impressionism is actually Techno Art
    • 132 Cubism is actually Techno Art
    • 133 Bauhaus’ Love for Machines
    • 134 Techno Art’s Social Purpose
  • Picture Credits
  • Colophon
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